Members' Login



Reset Password

CAAV News - 2019

Page 3 of 11 for 108 Results

Soils in Practice Events

28 October 2019

Farmers Weekly is running two Soils in Practice events, on 12th November 2019 at Coldstream in the Borders and on 14th November 2019 at Duxford in Cambridgeshire.

The events aim to help attendees understand some of the practical steps that can be taken to measure and promote healthy soil in a sustainable farm setting. Experts will present interactive theoretical and practical sessions on topics including: measuring soil components, nutrient management and pest mitigation, cover crops, organic matter utilisation and the likely implications of incoming legislation on soil health.

Details are available at https://www.fwi.co.uk/ms/events/soils-in-focus/

Lack of rural housing is a barrier to progressive farming

24 October 2019

Issues with rural housing are obstructing farming retirement and new entrants, limiting the progression of UK agriculture, says the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers (CAAV).  It needs to be freed up to help handle the loss of Basic Payment.

A new report on Retirement Housing for farmers in the United Kingdom, has highlighted specific issues in rural housing, flagging up the need to make changes in order to allow the younger generation to drive the industry forward.  Housing is so often found to be the obstacle to farming retirement and opportunities for entry.

The report, written by Jeremy Moody, secretary and adviser to the CAAV, for a consortium of the CAAV, University College of Estate Management (UCEM), The Prince’s Countryside Fund, The Royal Agricultural University and Northumbrian Water Group, highlights how lack of affordable housing can prevent farmers from retiring.

Farming is a multi-generational venture, explains Mr Moody. “Around 84% are second generation, but measures to enable the retirement of the older generation and the opening of doors for the younger generation are severely restricted.  Yet we shall need the greatest flexibility in this to manage post-Brexit change in the sector and give opportunities to the next generation.

“Sufficient housing is needed by everyone in the sector, but it’s frequently scarce and expensive in rural areas,” he explains. “Housing is one key obstacle to farmers when scaling down or retiring - whether through lack of availability or limitations in affording it.”

After considering a wide range of issues in understanding and tackling the practical problems around farming retirement and housing, the next steps are about turning this work into effective action across the UK. “We need to identify, share and promote good practice to encourage progressively better performance,” says Mr Moody.

Some solutions discussed in the report include relaxing local planning for retiring and for new farmers, such as rural exception sites, farm building conversion, tax allowances and the development of affordable housing. We also need to promote the opportunities now in policies to provide housing for the next farming generation, so that the retiring farmer can stay in the house he has always lived in, he adds.

“Taking this work forward will be about encouraging imaginative practice, proactive and positive behaviour and innovative solutions among all, from local planning authorities to families considering their future or discussions within landlord/tenant relationships,” says Mr Moody. “This needs to be in place as farmers react to the loss of Basic Payment, so we can manage change practically and give the best start to the proficient farmers of the future.”

 

Click here for the full report.

China opens doors to British Beef

19 October 2019

The Chinese government has finalised details of a UK-China agreement meaning UK farmers and beef producers will have full access to the Chinese market, estimated to be worth £230 million, for the first time in over 20 years. Further details can be found on the GOV.UK website.

Developer fined £300,000 for illegal tree felling

16 October 2019

The director of a property development company and the company itself - Enzo Homes - have been fined a total of £300,000 for the illegal felling of a giant redwood and 72 other trees near Swansea. The trees had been subject to a Tree Preservation Order. The tree surgeon who carried out the work was also fined £120,000 at Swansea Magistrates Court.

Government to introduce "ground-breaking" Environment Bill

15 October 2019

Later today (15th October), the government will introduce the Environment Bill to Parliament "to tackle the biggest environmental priorities of our time, signalling a historic step change in the way we protect and enhance our precious natural environment." Further details can be found on the GOV.UK website.

State Opening of Parliament - Queen's Speech

14 October 2019

The State Opening of Parliament took place ealier today and the Queen's Speech set out the government's agenda for the next session of Parliament. It annouced 26 Bills, including the reintroduction of the Agriculture Bill and an Environment Bill.

Chief Veterinary Officers urge poultry keepers to prepare for winter Avian Flu threat

07 October 2019

Poultry keepers are being urged by the Chief Veterinary Officers across the UK to make preparations now in order to reduce the risk of avian influenza in their birds over the coming winter months. Please see the GOV.UK website for further information.

Scottish National Student Award 2020

04 October 2019

The Scottish Land Commission is offering a £1,000 award to any student studying at a Scottish academic institution who undertakes a land reform related piece of research. The closing date for submissions is 24th January 2020 and details are available on the Scottish Land Commission website.

Prime Minister delivers Statement on Brexit Negotiations

03 October 2019

Earlier today, Prime Minister Boris Johnson delivered a Statement in the House of Commons on the Brexit negotiations with the EU. The Statement can be viewed on the GOV.UK website.

Use tax relief to boost farm productivity by £100m

03 October 2019

Adopting an Irish model of Income Tax relief in the UK could boost farmland lettings and increase agricultural productivity by over £100m.

According to a review of data from the Irish Revenue by the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers (CAAV), the area of let land in Ireland rose to cover 7% of farmland in 2017, compared to just 2% in 2011. This followed an increase in Income Tax relief introduced in 2015 on farmland let for more than five years, explains Jeremy Moody, secretary and adviser to the CAAV. “This has had a profound effect on encouraging the letting of land and if adopted in the UK could be very beneficial.”

The increased relief starts at €18,000 (£16,000) per year for a five-to-seven-year tenancy, going up to €40,000 (£35,500) for 15-year leases.*

As a result, around 450,000 acres were newly let at arm’s length for more than five years from 2015 to 2017. “By the end of 2017 a country with no tenancy system for over a century had created 10,000 landlords,” says Mr Moody.

Initial modelling of the same relief for the UK suggests that if a further 4% of farmland in Great Britain and 15% in Northern Ireland were let in this way, the productivity gain could top £100m, explains Mr Moody. “Ireland has seen a higher proportion of farmland let for five years or more between 2015 and 2017 than England, Scotland and Wales have under all new forms of tenancy. Ireland now has 7% of its farmland let for such periods compared to about 5% in Great Britain under FBTs and limited duration tenancies, and none in Northern Ireland. There’s much greater potential for land to be let across the UK, it just needs the right encouragement.”

Increasing access to land for proficient farmers is one key to answering the UK’s agricultural productivity challenge, highlights Mr Moody. “Both Ireland and the UK have poor performance when it comes to agricultural productivity growth – averaging just 1% a year for many years. As shown in the Horizon** report, had we kept pace with the US since 2000, the contribution of UK farming to the rural economy would have been £4.3bn higher by 2013. 

“If the UK had achieved this, it would have almost doubled the Total Income From Farming, which was £4.7bn in 2018,” he says.

Moving forward, land mobility should be an important component in achieving Defra’s targets to increase the growth of UK agriculture, adds Mr Moody. “The availability of land for productive and proficient farmers who will adopt new technologies and practices needs to be improved. Adopting an Income Tax relief policy similar to that of Ireland could be the key to making this happen.”

CAAV Review Paper: TAXATION, Agricultural Productivity and Land Occupation

Find a CAAV Member

Latest Product